Manual for a Perfect Government

Manual-for-p-govt-

John Hagelin featured in the film What the Bleep do You Know, and has applied his knowledge as a physicist, extending what he has learned from the laws of nature that can be applied to governance in the public sector. It would be refreshing for Australian governments to apply some of the principles on offer from Hagelin’s study. 

Natural Law Party

Hagelin and 12 others founded the Natural Law Party in April 1992 in Fairfeld, based on the view that problems of governance could be solved more effectively by following “natural law”, the organizing principle of the universe. The party platform included preventive health care, sustainable agriculture and renewable energy technologies. Hagelin favored abortion rights without public financing, campaign-finance law reform, improved gun control, and a flat tax, with no tax for families earning less than $34,000 a year. He campaigned to eradicate PACs and soft money campaign contributions, and advocated safety locks on guns, school vouchers, and efforts to prevent war in the Middle East by reducing “people’s tension”.

The party chose Hagelin and Mike Tompkins as its presidential and vice-presidential candidates in 1992 and 1996. Hagelin received 39,212 votes from 32 states in 1992 (and 23 percent of the vote in Jefferson County, where MUM is located), and 113,659 votes from 43 states in 1996 (21 percent in Jefferson County).

Hagelin ran for president again in 2000, nominated both by the NLP and by the Perot wing of the Reform Party, which disputed the nomination of Pat Buchanan. Hagelin’s running mate was Nat Goldhaber. A dispute over the Reform Party’s nomination generated legal action between the Hagelin and Buchanan campaigns. In September 2000 the Federal Election Commission ruled that Buchanan was the official candidate of the Reform Party, and hence eligible to receive federal election funds. The Reform Party convention that nominated Hagelin was declared invalid.In spite of the ruling, Hagelin remained on several state ballots as the Reform Party nominee because of the independent nature of some state affiliates; he was also the national nominee of the Natural Law Party, and in New York was the Independence Party nominee. He received 83,714 votes from 39 states. During the 2004 primary elections, Hagelin endorsed Democratic candidate Dennis Kucinich  and in April that year the Executive Committee of the NLP dissolved the NLP as a national organization.

The Core of Nature series explores the principles in his book The Manual for a Perfect Government

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